Report 2007-114 Recommendation 6 Responses

Report 2007-114: Low-Level Radioactive Waste: The State Has Limited Information That Hampers Its Ability to Assess the Need for a Disposal Facility and Must Improve Its Oversight to Better Protect the Public (Release Date: June 2008)

Recommendation #6 To: Public Health, Department of

When the Radiologic Health Branch has an understanding of the disposal needs for generators in California, it should develop an updated low-level waste disposal plan.

Annual Follow-Up Agency Response From May 2017

RHB met the statutory requirement for developing a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in 1982. In 2011, RHB performed a survey of all LLRW generators and found that the current quantity of waste in storage (119 cubic meters) is well below the storage space capacity (5,752 cubic meters). In reviewing the 2013 LLRW report, as well as the reported storage data in both the 2014 and 2015 reports, it is apparent that the total amount of LLRW stored in California continues to remain well below waste storage capacity. Through its new LLRW tracking system, referenced in recommendation 4 above and estimated to be completed and operational by September 2017, RHB will track waste storage, waste storage capacity, and waste volume annually and make that information available to the Legislature. In addition, LLRW disposal options are available to California generators including licensed disposal sites in both Utah and Texas.

  • Estimated Completion Date: September 2017

California State Auditor's Assessment of Annual Follow-Up Status: Pending


Annual Follow-Up Agency Response From May 2016

California has met the requirements of developing a low-level waste disposal plan under Health and Safety (H&S) Code Section 115005 by submitting a 100-page report to the California Legislature in 1982, which resulted in the Department pursuing a permanent disposal facility at the proposed Ward Valley site that never came to fruition. In 2011, the Radioactive Health Branch (RHB) performed a statewide survey of all waste generators. This survey showed that current class B and C storage waste quantity was at 119 cubic meters, well below the total storage capacity of 5,752 cubic meters. RHB believes that by implementing the low-level waste tracking solution referenced in recommendation 4, an ongoing monitoring process of waste storage capacity, and all other requirements of the law, will be monitored so future development of another low-level waste disposal plan is quickly identified.

  • Estimated Completion Date: 2018

California State Auditor's Assessment of Annual Follow-Up Status: Not Fully Implemented


Annual Follow-Up Agency Response From October 2013

CDPH does not believe an update to the low level waste disposal plan is necessary. CDPH continues to collect data from California's low level radioactive waste (LLRW) producers across the State and makes that data available to legislators and interested parties. The Energy Solution disposal facility in Clive, Utah, is available for California generators of class A LLRW. The Waste Control Specialists LLRW disposal facility located near Andrews, TX is available for California generators of class A, B, and C LLRW. In August 2011, CDPH surveyed California generators about their storage capacity for class B and C LLRW. Based on the survey responses, the storage capacity for class B and C LLRW will last for the next 10 to 20 years provided the options for thermal destruction and the Texas LLRW disposal facility remain available. CDPH remains committed to collecting data and working with the regulated community to inform any future updates that may be necessary to the LLRW disposal plan.

California State Auditor's Assessment of Annual Follow-Up Status: Will Not Implement


Annual Follow-Up Agency Response From November 2010

CDPH continues to collect data from California's low level radioactive waste (LLRW) producers across the State and make that data available to legislators and interested parties. The Energy Solution disposal facility in Clive, Utah, remains available for California generators of class A LLRW. In August 2011, CDPH performed a survey of California generators of their storage capacity for class B and C LLRW. Based on the responses of these generators, the storage capacity for class B and C LLRW will last for the next 10 to 20 years provided the options for thermal destruction and the Texas LLRW disposal facility remain available. CDPH remains committed to collecting data and working with the regulated community to inform any future updates that may be necessary to the LLRW disposal plan.

California State Auditor's Assessment of Annual Follow-Up Status: Will Not Implement


All Recommendations in 2007-114

Agency responses received after June 2013 are posted verbatim.


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